R.C. Gorman Bio

R. C. Gorman, American (1931 - 2005)

Rudolph Carl Gorman, or as he was more commonly known, R. C. Gorman was born in Chinle, Arizona, July 26, 1931, a Native American Artist of the Navajo Nation.

Gorman grew up in a traditional Navajo hogan and began drawing at age 3. After he left high school, he served in the Navy before entering college, where he majored in literature and minored in art at Northern Arizona University.

In 1958, he received the first scholarship from the Navajo Tribal Council to study outside of the United States. He enrolled in the art program at Mexico City College where he was influenced by the work Diego Rivera. He later studied art at San Francisco State University, where he also worked as a model.

Gorman moved from California to New Mexico, opening his Navajo Gallery in Taos in 1968. It was the first Native American-owned art gallery in Taos.

In 1973, he was the only living artist whose work was shown in the “Masterworks of the American Indian" show held at Metropolitan Museum in New York. One of his pieces was selected for the cover of the exhibit's catalog.

He is referred to as "the Picasso of American Indian art" by the New York Times, his paintings are primarily of Native American women and characterized by fluid forms and vibrant colors, though he also worked in sculpture, ceramics, and stone lithography. He was also an avid lover of cuisine, authoring four cookbooks, (with accompanying drawings) called Nudes and Food.)

Artworks




"Alma" Serigraph by R. C. Gorman

Title: "Alma" PP

Medium: Serigraph

Unframed Size: 36" x 29"

Retail Price: $2,600.00 - Unframed

Asking Price: $1,400.00



"Red Pepper" Lithograph by R C Gorman

Title: "Red Peppers"

Medium: Lithograph

Unframed Size: 25" x 24.5"

Retail Price: $4,800.00 - unframed

Asking Price: $1,600.00 - framed